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BrisSciFilm 2017 Winners!

A massive thank you to all those film makers, judges, attendees and everyone involved in Bristol Science Film Festival this year!

We announced the winners at the Cube Microplex on Sunday 19th March on the last day of Bristol Science Film Festival and British Science Week 2017.

Local Winner

To Be or Not To Be…Frozen – Shuang Chen Runyu Gao, Karina Espinoza

Local Runner Up

Everybody’s Free (To Cure Cystic Fibrosis) – Bartholomew Harvey

National Winner

Just a Touch – Maria Lia Malandrino, Federico Malandrino, Lev Tankelevitch, Cristiana Vagnoni

National Runner Up

Dish Life – Chloe Thomas

BBC Focus Prize Winner

What do scientists do? – The Scientific Method – Helen Cammack

We received all over the UK and from around the world! The standard was incredibly high and creating a shortlist was a real challenge. Thanks once again to all our Judges for selecting our Local and National winners.

The BBC Focus Prize shortlist is available here. The Prize was judged by the team at BBC Focus and the winner has the chance to create another commission for the BBC Focus website. Check out last years winners for more information.

We screened the full shortlist at the Cube Microplex and we will showing these films again on Big Screen Bristol  (FREE) on May 18th 2017.

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Women in STEM film premiere

On Thursday 16th March we premiered 4 newly commissioned films on issues facing Women in STEM at the At-Bristol Planetarium.

We were delighted to invite 4 panellists to discuss issues raised in films and open the floor up to questions and debate from the audience.

The first film of the evening was entitled ‘The 51% minorityby Caroline Tout.

[FILM TO BE UPLOADED SHORTLY]

Our second film was from Jen Lim a Film student at the University of Bristol.

[FILM TO BE UPLOADED SHORTLY]

Our next film was ‘Mrs Sommerville’s Monument, by local film making duo Liz Lister and Rebecca Hurwitz of WisterLitz Productions.

‘Mrs Somerville, the Queen of Nineteenth Century Science, is writing another book and this time it’s about science Nobel Prize winners. A lot of information comes her way, and not all of it seems relevant. But when some of that unwanted information starts to reveal another story, Mary takes decisive action.’

Our final film of the evening was ‘Halfway’ by Florence Schechter and the team at Collab Lab.

Films were followed by discussion from our panel of 4 women in STEM in different disciplines and at different stages of their career:

Dr Irina Lazar – University of Bristol
Dr Carolin Villforth – University of Bath
Sonam Gurung – University of Bristol
Isabel Wiltshire – Former University of Bristol Student

A summary of the topics discussed will follow shortly in another blog post!

The Core – debunking film science!

Couldn’t attend our screening of The Core?! Still craving some bad film goodness?

Our friends at The Cosmic Shed recorded at podcast on the night!
Listen along to our hilarious panellist as they point out the slight scientific inaccuracies…

‘Shed regular Ti Singh was on the panel for a special screening of the 2003 film The Core. Joining Ti were Beth Cotterell, Katie Cooper and Chris Dunford.
They split into teams to defend or destroy the film, ably hosted on the night by Robbie Kornitschky.’

BSFF-The-Core-696x491

You can also SEE our panellist sum up the amusingly bad science in our screening:

This was our 2nd event as part of Bristol Science Film Festival and British Science Week 2017.

Video first posted on the Bristol and Bath BSA Blog.

Eyescuras in action!

Have a look at highlights from our first event of the Bristol Science Film Festival and British Science Week 2017!

There’s still time to join in our remaining events including the Women in STEM Screening, BrisSciFilm at the Library and the Competition screening!

Posted first on our Bristol and Bath BSA Blog:

March 10th, the beginning of British Science Week, and we’re down in Millennium Square with Justin Quinnell, famed pin-hole camera expert.

But he’s not here with his cameras. He has four of his Eyescuras which, when placed on the head, turn the world upside down, just like your eyes do. But we have brains to turn the image the right way up.